virginia katz

ocean 2004-2005

After collaborating with Wind, and consulting with an Environmental Physicist at the University of California, Irvine, I learned that one of the characteristics of wind is that it is a fluid that moves through space similarly to water. It follows paths of least resistance and is subject to the subtlest weather conditions and geologic formations. Living not far from the coast, I began to turn my attention to the Ocean and its rhythmic movement. From the project’s beginning to the installation The Difference a Day Makes, over 150 trips were made to the same location at Newport Beach, California.

The size, color, and timing of the waves were observed and recorded under varying climactic conditions. As each wave broke, a line was painted that corresponded to it in relative size. If the wave was tall, a thick line was painted; if small, a thin line was painted. Some days were foggy and were painted in soft tints. On sunny days, the paint was crisp and vivid. At the time of installation all 130 scrolls were arranged in the dynamic form of a wave – undulating throughout the gallery space. I continued to add scrolls to this installation from daily observations until the exhibition’s end.

Ocean
The Difference a Day Makes

Watercolor on Washi Scrolls
130, 11' x 11", 2005

Ocean
The Difference a Day Makes - detail -


Ocean
The Difference a Day Makes - detail -


Ocean
The Difference a Day Makes - detail -


Ocean
The Difference a Day Makes - detail -


Ocean
The Difference a Day Makes - detail -


Ocean
The Difference a Day Makes II

Watercolor on Graph Paper
36" x 5", 2005

Ocean
Tidal Cycle, 3.5 Hours, [Low to High Tide, Calm Surf: 2-3ft.]

Charcoal and Graphite on Vellum
84" x 18", 2004

Ocean
Tidal Cycle, 3.5 Hours, [Low to High Tide, Calm Surf: 2-3ft.] - detail -


Ocean
Tidal Cycle 7 Hours [Low to High Tide, Relatively Calm surf: 2-4ft]

Watercolor on Paper
360" x 27", 2004

Ocean
Tidal Cycle 7 Hours [Low to High Tide, Relatively Calm surf: 2-4ft] - detail -


Transitions - Five Days reflects changes over a five-day period due to the Red Tide phenomenon of plankton bloom. The bloom causes the color of the water to become a bloody red and so were the resulting drawings.

Ocean
Transitions, Red Tide, Five Days

Watercolor on Graph Paper
7.5" x 60", 2005